Author Topic: Dark video relative to live display  (Read 287 times)

Jeff_Dawson

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Dark video relative to live display
« on: June 29, 2018, 06:22:08 PM »
Hi Everyone,

Perhaps a silly question (and roast me if it's a simple solution or I'm being a bone-head)... When filming with my Chronos camera with a fast shutter (say 10 us) I find the saved video (H.264, not RAW)  is dark relative to the image displayed on the camera.  I completely realize that the faster the shutter, the more light you need.  But my point is when looking at the camera display, the image is brighter than the off-loaded (saved) video.  So... how does the camera display render a superior quality (in terms of brightness) image relative to that saved to the SD card?

Jeff.

NiNeff

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Re: Dark video relative to live display
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2018, 08:14:04 AM »
As far as I know, the video displayed on the screen is the unencoded data directly from the RAM buffer.
The h.264 encoding done to store the non-raw data is a lossy compression, and therefore can't look exactly like the original.

tesla500

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Re: Dark video relative to live display
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2018, 10:48:52 AM »
The on-camera screen makes things look brighter than they actually are, your video is actually just dark but being masked by the screen. More light will help here.

Jeff_Dawson

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Re: Dark video relative to live display
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2018, 09:43:51 AM »
Thanks for the help and advice -- much appreciated.

I guess an added challenge, then, is that should I increase the lighting of the subject, the display image will show saturation... it makes it hard to use the display to set up shots.  On my old HS cameras, when the set-up images showed flaring/saturation it was a warning so as not to damage the image sensor.  Is it possible to damage this image sensor with too much light (I'm not talking a scenario that counts as abuse of the camera). 

I'm still getting a feel for this incredible camera!

Jeff.