Author Topic: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target  (Read 2065 times)

SlowEng

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2023, 07:34:32 AM »
Wow, I didn't know that so much light is needed for such recordings. I guess that I will have to place the lamp very close to the sample.

I attached a simple sketch of the view from above of my current test setup with which I got poor recordings (the sample was not used yet, shots went directly to the styrofoam block). It can be modified if needed (especially when it comes to light and camera placement). I'm not sure about the distances but the lamp was around 1.5 - 2 m away from the sample and the camera was < 1 m away from it. In the actual test, the camera should be placed perpendicular to the table (and thus also bullet trajectory). There's also an acrylic glass cover placed around the sample and the camera will be looking through it. Hopefully, it won't cause any issues with recording quality. The dimensions of the sample are around 90x90x23 mm. It will be attached to a wooden plate with aluminum profiles offsetting the sample from the plate (to see what happens after penetration). The plate will have a hole through which the bullet can pass.

The biggest issue is how to capture the proper region with the camera. It needs to include the sample (vertical rectangle of 90x23 mm size) and some area before and after it. With those narrow boxes captured at the highest frame rates, I would probably have to place the camera far away to capture everything. If I get too close, the camera with the current lens may not see or focus on the whole area of interest. Unless I'm missing something.

Edit: I removed the old post to replace the incorrect scheme - I forgot about the aluminum profiles offsetting the sample from the plate.

Nikon1

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2023, 07:37:57 AM »
Regards getting the Whole Sample in Frame, would Mounting the Camera Vertically work for you?
 The Chronos has a 1/4" Tripod Screw Hole on the Side of the Grip/ Battery, intended Mainly for Mounting it at an 90 Angle.
 That way you would get an very High Frame to Capture that Sample.
 Is this what you are Looking for?
 .
 Regards deleting the Post, you can just go to Modify Post, then Delete the Attachment and Attach a new one, no real Need to delete the whole Post.

SlowEng

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2023, 07:44:08 AM »
Right, vertical positioning of the camera could make sense in this case. I just wonder if the bar is not too narrow. What would be the approximate optimal distance between the camera and the sample here? And the distance between the light and the sample? Should I place the light right behind the camera (once it's perpendicular to the table) or more to the side?

Yeah, I tried editing the post but I couldn't remove the old attachment and both versions were added to the post. Maybe because I was using another computer.

Nikon1

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2023, 07:58:54 AM »
For Lighting, maybe Start with something, like i did Here for the 20kfps Shot:
 forum.krontech.ca/index.php?topic=521.msg4950#msg4950
 I Put one of my 300 Watt Lights Right Behind the Subject, because i needed to Close the Lens down very much, to get a Lot of Depth of Field, while also running 20kfps. This of course will make the Subject look very Dark --- Keep in mind this is an Actively Burning Sparkler / Fireworks, so in it self rather Bright Object. But it will ensure you that you will get somewhat decent Image Quality overall and you will be able to See Silhouettes, if that fits your Task; but Details in Texture or of the Surface itself Might get lost.
 That should at least make it Possible to Record a bright enough image with that one Light you got.
 From There you can Try to move the Light to ABOVE the Sample, shining Down on an angle from the Direction of the Air Gun, as close to the Sample as Possible without being in the Way or in Frame.
 Thats Where i would probably have that Light in this Situation...?
 .
 Regards Framing, you can still try to start with some Less Extreme Settings like 5400fps, which will give you a much more Square Aspect Ratio. If the Lights are Set up right, you will still get a lot of Information from that Recording cause its much cleaner and better Visible, and can then decide which Part of the Frame you want to Record at the Very High Framerates if needed.

Nikon1

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2023, 01:26:03 PM »
Just wondering, if you where able to improve your Results after all?

Solscud007

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Re: Settings to capture air gun bullet hitting the target
« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2023, 08:59:54 AM »
Not sure if you will see this since you haven't updated this in a month. I have filmed a lot of projectiles out of firearms. You need a lot of light like Nikon 1 said. You also need to adjust your slider (shutter angle) otherwise your projectile will be a blur. I tend to use a 10:1 ratio for muzzle velocity. If an object is moving 92 m/s that is close to 300 feet per second. I will film that at 3k frames per second then or higher.

Here is a video of a bullet moving around 800 fps. But I filmed it at 11k frames per second and 32k frames per second. I had to use a bright studio light shining directly on the muzzle to get some semblance of an image at 32 fps.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CtVnJVzNe3r/